Work Package 4

Boosting value chain

The WP4 aims to evaluate new and improved technologies implemented in the WP2 and WP3 in order to:

  • Assess the socio-economic effect of technologies and practices for farmers relative to a counterfactual;

  • Identify new value chains for the new and improved technologies and practices;

  • Assess stakeholder response on the feasibility of new technologies, practices and value chains;

  • Produce decision support and guidance.

Tasks and Role of the Partners

Partners involved: CRAN, UNISS, ACRA, UNB, INERA, UNIMAK, CSIR-SARI, KDC, KALRO, UoN, NM-AIST, TARI, HU, JU, ICRAF

WP Leader: Anil Graves

WP Co-Leaders: Sheila Okoth, James Mantent Kombiok

Task 4.1: Identification and assessment of the environmental impacts of the new and improved technologies and nonmarket externalities (M2-M48)

Lead partner: CRAN; Participants: UNISS, UNB, INERA, UNIMAK, CSIR-SARI, KDC, KALRO, UoN, NM-AIST, TARI, HU, JU, ICRAF

Sub-Task 4.1.1: Identification of the biophysical impacts

Sub-Task 4.1.2: Assessment of environmental impacts and non-market externalities

This Task will work with WP2, 3 and 5 to identify the biophysical impacts of the new and improved technologies and existing technologies in order to provide the basis for making valid comparisons between the technologies. Data will be identified using experimental data, real farm data, farmer and expert observations, and parameterised and calibrated computer simulation models if needed for long-term technologies such as agroforestry. The task will also assess the wider impacts of the technologies and the costs and benefits that these bring to other stakeholders in the form of externalities, using an environmental valuation approach. The environmental burdens associated with the case study technologies and practices will be quantified and the extent of their impact evaluated in monetary terms within a full cost benefit analysis using a benefits-transfer approach. Through this, an analysis of the trade-off between private net benefits to farmer and the public net benefits to third parties affected by the farmers decisions will be made for the innovative technologies and practices and their counterfactuals.

 

Task 4.2: Quantification of the set of capital, land, and labour requirement associated with each technology and practice (M8-M48)

Lead partner: CRAN; Participants: UNISS, UNB, INERA, UNIMAK, CSIR-SARI, KDC, KALRO, UoN, NM-AIST, TARI, HU, JU, ICRAF

The generation of benefits from land use technologies and practices is associated with management inputs. The management required for each of the case study innovations and their counterfactuals selected in Task 4.1 will be identified in order to quantify the set of capital, land, and labour required by each technology and practice. Initial investment costs and recurring costs will be identified and their occurrence in time quantified. A set of templates for the data will be developed; these data will be described and collected in the database established in Task 4.1.

 

Task 4.3: Bio-economic modelling of new technologies and practices (M17-M48)

Lead partner: CRAN; Participants: KDC, UoN

The biophysical and economic data will be combined in the FarmSAFE model to calculate the impacts at a plot scale, and at a farm scale. New technologies create new patterns of resource use, for example by altering labour requirements or the cost of management inputs. A key requirement in this modelling will be to see how the new technology or practice will alter and impose new resource opportunities and constraints on other farm activities and in the long-term. These analyses will be developed in the FarmSAFE model, which will be adapted to examine the specific technologies and practices identified in WP2 and WP3. Since the technologies may operate over several years, the net present value will be used to identify the robustness of the new technologies and practices. The evaluation will also include an assessment undertaken by farmers of their own ability given on-going farm management commitments to manage the shifts in inputs once the input, benefit and cost streams have been mapped out in time.

 

Task 4.4: Linked industry and value chain analysis (M13-M48)

Lead partner: CRAN; Participants: UNISS, UNB, INERA, UNIMAK, CSIR-SARI, KDC, KALRO, UoN, NM-AIST, TARI, HU, JU, ICRAF

The implementation of new technologies and practices alters requirements on linked industries and supply chains, both up- and down-stream of the farm. This task will identify and map the linked industries and fair-trade organizations, supply chains and identify potential value chains for the new technologies and practices. Using the knowledge of farmers and key informants, current critical industries and the supply chain will be mapped. Then with the help of key informants and other actors, a set of feasible value chain options for the new technologies and practices will be explored. The feasibility of these value chains will be assessed drawing on the bio-economic analysis and in light of the opportunities and constraints associated with existing supply chains and linked industries. Promising value chains that provide added value and that can operate effectively within the fabric of local and national social and economic circumstances will be identified.

Objective

 

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 862848

Contact us 

 ewabelt@uniss.it

For Communication and Dissemination activities

 info@ewabelt.eu

Information about Our Privacy Policies

  • Twitter Icon sociale
  • Facebook
  • Instagram

Powered by OCCAM